Cheyna Roth

Reporter - Michigan Public Radio Network

Before becoming the newest Capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, Cheyna Roth was an attorney. She spent her days fighting it out in court as an assistant prosecuting attorney for Ionia County.

Eventually, Cheyna took her investigative and interview skills and moved on to journalism.

She earned her masters degree at Michigan State University and was a documentary filmmaker, podcaster, and freelance writer before finding her home with NPR.

Very soon after joining MPRN, Cheyna started covering the 2016 presidential election, chasing after Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and all their surrogates as they duked it out for Michigan.

Cheyna also focuses on the Legislature and criminal justice issues for MPRN.

Cheyna is obsessively curious, a passionate storyteller, and an occasional backpacker.

Detroit Water Front
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR Public Media

Environmental groups say a bill headed for Governor Rick Snyder’s desk could increase the amount of invasive species in the Great Lakes.     


marijuana photo
Brett Levin / Flickr Creative Commons

November is months away. But the group that put recreational marijuana use on the general election ballot is already planning how to convince voters to mark ‘yes.’

Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol is getting some outside help.


Cars on Lansing area highway
WKAR-MSU

Some lawmakers in Lansing are trying – once again –  to tackle the state’s car insurance rates. Michigan’s rates are among the highest in the nation.


On this week's Current State - suicide prevention in Michigan; what former MSU dean William Strampel could face during trial; Michigan to vote on legalizing marijuana; cooking Kugel; constructing vehicles that drive 1600 miles without stopping for gas; remembering Robert F. Kennedy's impact on Michiganders; and find out where a 1-million square foot pot warehouse is being built in the Great Lakes. 


Michigan residents in the Healthy Michigan insurance program are a signature away from mandated work requirements.


Prevailing wage is now a thing of Michigan’s past. The House and Senate passed an initiative Wednesday to get rid of the law that requires workers be paid union-level wages on public contracts.


The state Legislature is getting closer to requiring that people in the Healthy Michigan insurance program work to get those benefits. The bill is now one vote away from the governor’s desk.


William Strampel
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

A former dean at Michigan State University will go to trial for sexual misconduct and other charges.


Larry Nassar photo
Katie Cook / WKAR

State lawmakers expect to hold a key vote on the remaining bills in response to Larry Nassar this week. The bills will likely be voted out of a Senate committee – with at least one change. 


Creative Commons

State lawmakers can now vote to repeal Michigan’s prevailing wage law. Prevailing wage requires the state pay union-scale wages on its contracts. Capital corresnpondent Cheyna Roth reports the Board of State Canvassers certified a ballot initiative Friday. It gives the Legislature a chance to pass the measure instead of letting the voters decide.


Flickr - Todd Ehlers

Michigan’s top prosecutor is on board with proposed changes to how the state parole board determines if an inmate can be released from prison.     


picture of the Michigan Capitol Building
lehooper / flickr creative commons

The Michigan Supreme Court won’t review issues against a ballot initiative to end prevailing wage, so the measure must move forward. And lawmakers could vote on the measure as soon as next week.  


picture of the Michigan Capitol Building
lehooper / flickr creative commons

State lawmakers want to put more money into school safety. A bipartisan group of Senators introduced legislation Tuesday, similar bills were introduced recently in the state House. The bills are backed by a coalition of law enforcement and education groups.


Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

As temperatures rise, lawmakers in Lansing want to make sure people aren’t leaving their animals in their cars.


medical stethescope
Rohvannyn / Pixabay

Medical experts in Michigan say reducing the stigma of HIV is key to stopping the spread of the disease.


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