Sheril Kirshenbaum

Host, Serving Up Science

Serving Up Science host Sheril Kirshenbaum is a history buff, science writer, and curious foodie.

Sheril also hosts Michigan State's Our Table round table series exploring where our food comes from and how it influences our lives. She is also executive director of Science Debate, a nonprofit, nonpartisan initiative to restore science to its rightful place in politics.

Sheril Kirshenbaum works to enhance public understanding of science and improve communication between scientists, policymakers, and the public.

On this week's show: Michigan's Governors Race; Lawsuit alleging a 1992 sexual assault by Larry Nassar and cover-up; Political climate affecting international students at MSU; The Great American Read; "talking" sidewalks in Lansing; Archived interview with Dr. Lena Wen; the history of apples in America.


Red Delicious Apple Dethroned
Pixabay Creative Commons / Photo editing by Amanda Barberena

Red Delicious apples have been around since the end of the 19th century. They were a favorite due to their dark red color, suggesting the apple's ripeness. On this episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss America’s favorite apples.


Whole Grain Bread
Pixabay Creative Commons

Low carb diets seem like a good idea on the surface, but all nutrients are necessary in moderation. On this episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega speak with Dr. Robin Tucker, assistant professor in the department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University, about the pros and cons of a low carb diet.


Hamburger
Daniel Carlbom / Flickr creative commons

On top of farm-raised vs. wild-caught, and GMO vs. non-GMO, you may soon be faced with another decision when buying meat at the grocery store: farm-raised vs....laboratory-grown. On this week's Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss the looming possibility of meat made in a petri dish. 


spoon with sugar
Marco Verch / Flickr Creative Commons

How does sugar really affect our health? On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega bring light to a study done on the health effects of sugar, a study that Big Sugar tried to sweep under the rug. 


Creative Commons

The idea of genetically modified food makes a lot of people nervous. These concerns are usually due to a misunderstanding of how genetic modification works. With an ever-growing global population, these foods will become essential to the survival of many. This week, Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega break down how scientists are using the new technology CRISPR to grow better food.


Mike Mozart / Flickr Creative Commons

In an attempt to derail its biggest competitor's new product, Coca-Cola devised a marketing plan with sinister motivations. In today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega unwrap the short history of Crystal Pepsi and the plan to get it off the market. 


Melissa / Flickr Creative Commons

If your kids packed their own lunch, what would it look like? After speaking to the kids at the Spartan Child Development Center in East Lansing, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega say it might be healthier than you'd imagine. On this week's episode of Serving Up Science, Sheril and Karel interviewed some 5-year olds to find out how much they really know about healthy eating. 


Tailgating grill photo
Andrew Sprung / flickr creative commons

Independence Day is the biggest grilling day of the year, and grill-masters all over the country are going to be putting their skills to the test. While grilling is an age-old technique, you can look to science to perfect your craft. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega uncover the science behind making the best (and safest!) grilled meat.


Rebecca Siegel / Flickr creative commons

More than just a millennial foodie trend, pickling has roots that go all the way back to ancient Mesopotamia. What was once a tool used to preserve foods in the harshest of climates is now filling mason jars in refrigerators all over the country. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega dive deep into the origins of pickling, and give some tasty advice to amateur picklers.


kittenfc / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that 48 million Americans are affected by food-borne illnesses every year? Luckily, on today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss how you can avoid that fate. Whether it be washing your hands for longer than you think, or being extra careful about separating your foods, there are lots of ways you can make sure dinner is yummy and safe. 


fisherman holding salmon
Wikamedia commons

When buying fish, do you find yourself wrestling with whether to buy "Wild-Caught" or "Farm-Raised"? Fear no more, because this week, sea cucumber expert and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum, and WKAR's Karel Vega dive into the pros and cons of the two sources.

Last week, Sheril and Karel uncovered some of the secrets about food labels. This week, they demystify another.


On this week's Current State - suicide prevention in Michigan; what former MSU dean William Strampel could face during trial; Michigan to vote on legalizing marijuana; cooking Kugel; constructing vehicles that drive 1600 miles without stopping for gas; remembering Robert F. Kennedy's impact on Michiganders; and find out where a 1-million square foot pot warehouse is being built in the Great Lakes. 


Karel Vega / Created using Creative Commons Images

They say never judge a book by its cover. This week, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega add: never judge a food by its label. Although the cute labels that read "Gluten Free" and "Non-GMO" might seem appealing, they are often not a useful representation of the product within. 


On this edition of Current State: Michigan teachers who say they are leaving the classroom because they cannot afford to remain in the profession; PBS President & CEO Paula Kerger talks about why more Americans are tuning into public media for news content and the network's expanding education role; perspective on an MSU alum who will help pick the next president; and the return of "Ondas en Espanol" host Tony "El Chayo" Cervantes. 


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