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On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

All right, joining us now to talk more about these legal developments is Joyce Vance. She's a former U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Alabama. Welcome.

JOYCE VANCE: Thanks for having me.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Republican Sen. Susan Collins says Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh told her he views the landmark abortion rights ruling Roe v. Wade as "settled law."

That assurance, made during a Tuesday morning meeting in the Maine senator's office that lasted more than two hours, likely goes a long way toward securing a key vote for Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Congratulations are in order for the Eagles. The American rock band's first compilation album, Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975, has just surpassed Michael Jackson's Thriller as the best-selling album of all time. The comp, which collects nine singles and "Desperado," is now 38-times platinum as certified by the Recording Industry Association of America — meaning it has sold a total of 38,000,000 albums worldwide and bested Thriller's 33-times platinum certification.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF MICHAEL JACKSON SONG, "THRILLER")

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