Children

Kelvin Torbert was Michigan’s Mr. Basketball in 2001 before playing college ball at Michigan State. With his playing days behind him, Torbert has launched a new endeavor as a children’s book author. We talk with Kelvin Torbert and co-author Kellen Brandon about “KT and the Radical Roundball.”


Neighbors in Action: Small Talk

Mar 9, 2016
Small Talk image
Courtesy image / Small Talk

Neighbors in Action this week looks at an organization working to help victims of child abuse navigate the criminal justice process. We speak with Small Talk executive director Alex Brace and Detective Shannon Thielen from the Lansing Police Department.


Generic family photo
Eric Ward / Wikimedia Commons

The role of the state’s Child Protective Services is to protect Michigan kids from abuse and neglect. It is also supposed to prioritize keeping children with their parents whenever possible. But some parents say the agency isn’t doing enough to keep families together, leading to more children in Michigan’s foster care system. We talk to reporter Justin Hinkley about his recent investigation into those claims for the Lansing State Journal.


Dr. Dele Davies photo
Courtesy photo / The Davies Project

Parents who care for chronically ill children face enormous challenges. Often, simply getting their child to the doctor or hospital is one of them. A program in Lansing seeks to connect volunteer drivers with families in need, but organizers say their work is about more than mere transportation. We talks with two members of The Davies Project.


MSU study encourages letting kids be kids

Oct 6, 2015
WKAR File Photo

A new Michigan State University study indicates that women who were expected to take on responsibilities beyond their years as children are less likely to be sensitive to their own children’s needs. The study is online now and will be published in the Journal of Family Psychology.

Current State’s Melissa Benmark talks with the study's author, Dr. Amy Nuttall. She’s an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Development & Family Studies at MSU.

Melissa first asked what the study set out to find.

Yesterday, the public policy organization Michigan’s Children held a forum called “Raising the Voices of Caregivers from the Foster Care System” to discuss how to improve the system. Current State speaks with Michele Corey, vice president of programs at Michigan’s Children, and state Rep. Jim Runestad.


Erik Larson Impression 5 photo
Peter Whorf / WKAR

A new water exhibit at the Impression 5 Science Museum in Lansing is getting a huge financial boost from the Rotary Club of Lansing.


http://www.roscoeorman.com/

“Sesame Street” is one of television’s most enduring programs, having educated and entertained children for decades. WKAR-TV airs “Sesame Street” at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. weekdays and at 9 a.m. on weekends. Next week, one of the show’s stars will visit six libraries around Lansing.

Kevin Lavery/WKAR

St. Vincent Catholic Charities in Lansing is one of the largest human service providers in Michigan. One of its core missions is caring for at-risk children. Some have direct, ongoing ties with their parents, while others are in foster care. The organization has just completed its first year of a new clinical assessment program designed to place kids in the best possible care setting.

A mid-Michigan author has published a book that examines the connection between childhood’s imaginary worlds and adulthood creativity. Michelle Root-Bernstein is an historian, independent scholar, and educator affiliated with Michigan State University, and she is very interested in what makes people creative. Her recent book is called "Inventing Imaginary Worlds: From Childhood Play to Adult Creativity Across the Arts and Sciences".

http://www.jacquelinewoodson.com/

An award-winning author of books for young readers is coming to East Lansing this week. Jacqueline Woodson's 30 books for young adults, middle graders and children have won a multitude of awards including a National Book Award in 2014 for “Brown Girl Dreaming”. The MSU Department of Teacher Education is bringing her in for a talk tonight.

http://www.cdtjourneyforthekids.com/

Like thousands of Michigan baby-boomers, Ken Dawson is planning to retire soon. Dawson has spent six years at Michigan State University, most recently as a project representative in the school’s Infrastructure, Planning and Facilities Department. Unlike many of those retiring boomers, he will soon be embarking on a challenging adventure. Beginning in about a month, the Farmington Hills resident will begin a 3,100 mile hike atop the spine of North America: the Continental Divide.

Michigan takes a lot of pride in its nickname as the “comeback” state. And after taking a beating during the Great Recession, Michigan is indeed on the upswing. Forecasts say the state should continue to see economic growth and improvements to the unemployment rate in the next two years. But not everyone is feeling the impact of that recovery yet. Among those left behind are the nearly 550,000 Michigan children living in poverty.

Flickr - Brian Hart

Early childhood education is really important. Years of research have shown that a quality pre-school can have a big impact on a child’s learning later on. And it’s especially important for kids of color or from low-income backgrounds. But for years, Michigan was leaving behind tens of thousands of its most vulnerable kids.

State, child welfare advocates spar over DHS oversight

Dec 8, 2014
http://www.childrensrights.org/

After six years of federal oversight, Michigan is seeking to reclaim control of its child welfare system. The state came under supervision of federal monitors in 2008. That was after a 2006 class action lawsuit that alleged the Michigan Department of Human Services had failed to protect the safety and well-being of almost 19,000 children in state custody.

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