History

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This week marks the 150th anniversary of the turning point of the American Civil War: the Battle of Gettysburg.

During this week in 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s all-out attempt to invade the North was turned down by the Army of the Potomac led by Union General George Meade.

The battle ended with more than 50,000 killed and wounded. Michigan men suffered 40 percent casualties. Gettysburg sent the South on the road to its 1865 surrender.

Courtesy of Benjamin Calvin Wilson

Throughout Michigan's history, the state's African American population is often portrayed as an urban population. But that depiction overlooks a part of Michigan’s history.

Many African Americans settled in rural areas, before and after the Civil War. In 1860, Cass County was home to more than 1,500 blacks, surprisingly that was just under the number of African Americans found in Wayne County at the time.

Two years after Fukushima, Japan still recovering

May 20, 2013
File photo

 Originally aired on March 14, 2013. 

 Two years ago, a massive earthquake struck off the coast of Japan. The quake triggered a tsunami which damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, causing the world’s worst radiation leak since the Chernobyl accident in 1986.  

Oldsmobile through the decades

Apr 4, 2013
Joe Ross via Flicker

   The R.E. Olds transportation museum houses a diverse collection of Oldsmobiles dating from 1897 to 2004.

It also includes a wide array of auto and industrial history covering about  a century, including a nearly complete collection of Michigan license plates, early traffic signs and a working 1950s-era traffic signal.

Bill Adcock is the Executive Director of the RE Olds Transportation Museum.  He recently joined WKAR’s Peter Whorf for a tour of the museum.

By Emanuele Berry

 

MSU’s G. Robert Vincent Voice Library is now home to the largest collection of of interviews with people in the Americas who survived the bombings in Nagasaki and Hiroshima. The interviews provide insight into the global network of survivors and the issues which they continue to face.  Dr. Naoko Wake has a joint appointment in MSU’s Lyman Briggs College and the Department of History. Naoko, who helped bring the collection to the library, discusses  the interviews and what she’s learned from listening.

How Tigers helped Michigan bear 1968 summer

Mar 28, 2013
Tigers Stadium
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With riots, the Vietnam War, and the King and Kennedy assassinations, 1968 was a tumultuous year for the United States. In Michigan, the success of the World Series champion, the Detroit Tigers, helped people get through that difficult time.

Tim Wendel, author of "Summer of  '68: The Season that Changed Baseball and America, Forever," chronicles the relationship between the events of that time and the baseball heroes of that year.

A tour of Lansing's Albert Kahn building

Mar 22, 2013

  Architect Albert Kahn was famous for his Michigan buildings, among them Detroit’s Fisher Building and General Motors Headquarters, Ann Arbor’s Hill Auditorium and the many functional but distinctive factories and industrial facilities throughout Detroit and the U.S. Lansing is home to one Kahn building, the former Motor Wheel Factory.

Two years after Fukushima, Japan still recovering

Mar 14, 2013
Wikimedia Commons

Two years ago, a massive earthquake struck off the coast of Japan. The quake triggered a tsunami which damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, causing the world’s worst radiation leak since the Chernobyl accident in 1986.  

On Monday, MSU will commemorate the anniversary with an event at the International Center.  One of the speakers, Dr. Ethan Segal, a professor of history at MSU and an expert on Japan, assesses the rebuilding efforts and discusses Japan’s complex relationship with nuclear power. 

Courtesy of MSU Press

Forty years ago, 200 members of the American Indian Movement took over the town of Wounded Knee, South Dakota.  The group was protesting the federal government’s failure to honor various treaties with native tribes.  The location was symbolic.  In 1890, as many as 300 Lakota Indians were killed at Wounded Knee by the U-S Army.  The standoff lasted 73 days and claimed three lives.

The 55th annual Detroit Boat Show runs now through Sunday at Cobo Center. The expo showcases everything from power boats to pontoons, and even a little Great Lakes history. This year is the bicentennial of the epic Battle of Lake Erie, which occurred during the War of 1812.
 

Tall ships of the British and United States navies clashed in September of 1813.  The Americans won this crucial battle, which may be best-remembered for the famous message delivered by Commodore Oliver Perry:  “We have met the enemy, and he is ours…”
 

Peter Whorf

Mike Whorf is known to countless Michigan and Midwestern radio listeners as the long-time host of WJR's Kaleidoscope.  The daily program which aired from the mid-1960s to the late 90s won the coveted Peabody Award in 1968, as well as numerous other statewide and national honors.

Courtesy/The Henry Ford

Today marks the centennial of the birth of civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks.

Courtesy/Roger Rosentreter

MSU historian Roger Rosentreter returns today to help us remember an important battle in the War of 1812: the Battle at the River Raisin, 200 years ago this week.

Roger Rosentreter collection

Today marks the 150th anniversary of a turning point in the Civil War: the battle of Antietam.

The Maryland battle marked the Confederate army’s first invasion of the north, and it would become the bloodiest day in American history. More than

23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded or reported missing.           

Courtesy: U.S. History Images

Today marks the bicentennial of the surrender of Detroit to the British in the War of 1812. The key figure is American General William Hull.

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