medicaid

capitol photo
WKAR File Photo

Healthy Michigan means better credit for Michigan’s low-income residents. That’s according to a new study on the state’s Medicaid expansion released Monday. It found that people on the plan improved their financial health since getting the insurance coverage.

AG Bill Schuette
File photo / WKAR-MSU

Republican Bill Schuette said Wednesday that he wouldn't undo Michigan's expansion of Medicaid coverage if he were governor, refuting Democrats' accusation that electing him would lead to hundreds of thousands of adults losing their government health insurance.

Rick Snyder
WKAR-MSU

Work or education is now required for many Michigan residents receiving Medicaid health coverage.

Rick Snyder
WKAR-MSU

Gov. Rick Snyder has signed into law a plan to repeal and replace Michigan's tax on health insurance claims that is used to help fund Medicaid for low-income residents.

Michigan residents in the Healthy Michigan insurance program are a signature away from mandated work requirements.


The state Legislature is getting closer to requiring that people in the Healthy Michigan insurance program work to get those benefits. The bill is now one vote away from the governor’s desk.


City of Lansing seal and flags displayed
WKAR-MSU

More than 500,000 able-bodied, nonelderly adults in Michigan's Medicaid expansion program would have to work or meet related requirements to keep qualifying for government health insurance under a revised bill that cleared a major legislative hurdle on Wednesday and is expected to become law.

A northern Michigan lawmaker is defending legislation that would require people to work to qualify for Medicaid.  Opponents of the bill say it would unfairly affect African Americans living in cities. 


Doctor's office
Creative Commons

The state House opened hearings Wednesday on a bill that would require able-bodied people on Medicaid to have a job, be looking for work, or be enrolled in school. As we hear from Capital Bureau Chief Rick Pluta, the bill faces obstacles.


On the April 21-22, 2018 edition of Current State: a new bill to make thousands of Medicaid recipients in Michigan work for their benefits, an MSU professor gives his thoughts on the controversy at Starbucks, Kendrick Lamar wins a Pulitzer, a new place to watch glass-blowing in Michigan and meet the "last keeper of the light" in Ireland. Saturday at 11:00 a.m. & Sunday at 4:00 p.m. on 90.5 FM. 


Capitol building
File Photo / WKAR-MSU

Able-bodied Medicaid recipients in Michigan may soon have to choose between finding a job or losing health insurance.

Michigan could soon require certain people to work for their Medicaid benefits. A bill passed a state Senate panel Wednesday.


Doctor's Office
Flickr - Susan

The state Legislature began discussions Wednesday on the newest plan to make people work for Medicaid.


Snyder touts Healthy Michigan, as House Republicans move to stop enrollment. 

medical stethescope
Rohvannyn / Pixabay

A Michigan healthcare policy expert says it will take time to analyze the potential impact on the state of the proposed Republican replacement for Obamacare.

Dennis Paradis is Executive Director of the Michigan Health Policy Forum. 

He says he’s concerned about the impact of its eventual cap on federal funding of Medicaid.

About 630,000 Michigan residents have purchased health insurance because the Affordable Care Act led to Medicaid expansion in the state. 

The Healthy Michigan program is funded almost completely with federal subsidies.

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