Science & Technology

Science and Technology

Hamburger
Daniel Carlbom / Flickr creative commons

On top of farm-raised vs. wild-caught, and GMO vs. non-GMO, you may soon be faced with another decision when buying meat at the grocery store: farm-raised vs....laboratory-grown. On this week's Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss the looming possibility of meat made in a petri dish. 


Computer
Pixabay Creative Commons

Gov. Rick Snyder has unveiled a plan that would make universal access to high-speed internet available throughout Michigan.

Thomas Glasmacher FRIB photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

The $730-million dollar Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, under construction at Michigan State University will be open to the public on Saturday.


Brian Kirschensteiner photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

If you’ve ever visited an art museum, you’re familiar with the small information signs posted next to the works on display. There, you’ll find the name of the artist, the title of the piece, and other information. At Michigan State University, the Broad Art Museum hopes to use new technology to provide a lot more than the basics.


spoon with sugar
Marco Verch / Flickr Creative Commons

How does sugar really affect our health? On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega bring light to a study done on the health effects of sugar, a study that Big Sugar tried to sweep under the rug. 


Creative Commons

The idea of genetically modified food makes a lot of people nervous. These concerns are usually due to a misunderstanding of how genetic modification works. With an ever-growing global population, these foods will become essential to the survival of many. This week, Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega break down how scientists are using the new technology CRISPR to grow better food.


Tom Guarr photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

The world is looking for ways to store the power generated by wind farms and solar panels. A Michigan State University researcher is working on one way to do that efficiently and, possibly, more safely.


Mike Mozart / Flickr Creative Commons

In an attempt to derail its biggest competitor's new product, Coca-Cola devised a marketing plan with sinister motivations. In today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega unwrap the short history of Crystal Pepsi and the plan to get it off the market. 


Melissa / Flickr Creative Commons

If your kids packed their own lunch, what would it look like? After speaking to the kids at the Spartan Child Development Center in East Lansing, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega say it might be healthier than you'd imagine. On this week's episode of Serving Up Science, Sheril and Karel interviewed some 5-year olds to find out how much they really know about healthy eating. 


Tailgating grill photo
Andrew Sprung / flickr creative commons

Independence Day is the biggest grilling day of the year, and grill-masters all over the country are going to be putting their skills to the test. While grilling is an age-old technique, you can look to science to perfect your craft. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega uncover the science behind making the best (and safest!) grilled meat.


Rebecca Siegel / Flickr creative commons

More than just a millennial foodie trend, pickling has roots that go all the way back to ancient Mesopotamia. What was once a tool used to preserve foods in the harshest of climates is now filling mason jars in refrigerators all over the country. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega dive deep into the origins of pickling, and give some tasty advice to amateur picklers.


kittenfc / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that 48 million Americans are affected by food-borne illnesses every year? Luckily, on today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss how you can avoid that fate. Whether it be washing your hands for longer than you think, or being extra careful about separating your foods, there are lots of ways you can make sure dinner is yummy and safe. 


Ziv Levi and Jeff Rehm photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR/MSU

Can a hacker seize control of your car? What’s the worst that could happen? The answers are yes, that could happen someday, and the result could be plenty bad.

A Michigan company is working on ways to improve the cyber security of cars.


traffic lights
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

When you talk about safety in vehicles, you usually think of seatbelts, brakes and airbags. But future safety will literally mean our cars and trucks communicating with stop lights! 


Our entire show is focused on Michigan Technology – changing the way we drive, we live and our health. 

Pages