Abigail Censky

Politics/Government Reporter

Abigail Censky is the Politics & Government reporter at WKAR.

Abigail joined WKAR in December 2018.

Prior to joining WKAR, Abigail served as news intern at St. Louis Public Radio, covering the Missouri 2018 midterm elections; and covered Colorado politics as a reporter with the Colorado Springs Gazette.

Abigail Censky has a bachelor's degree from Colorado College.

Representative Elissa Slotkin at a town hall in 2019. Slotkin, who's co-sponsoring the Justice in Policing Act is against broader protest calls to defund police.
Alec Gerstenberger for WKAR

Lawmakers around the country are grappling with how to reform the police following weeks of mass protests against police brutality set off by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Congressional Democrats have introduced a bill with a number of police reforms from banning chokeholds to weakening qualified immunity for police, but the Democrats have largely resisted protester demands to defund the police.

Signs hang on a wrought iron fence outside of the state capitol. Wednesday’s march was the latest in Lansing as part of a nationwide swell of protests for Black lives and against police brutality in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

“Black Lives Matter” boomed from loudspeakers, echoing across the lawn of the Michigan State Capitol at the NAACP’s “We Are Done Dying March.”

Wednesday’s march was the latest in Lansing as part of a nationwide swell of protests for Black lives and against police brutality in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd.

Protesters have staged nightly protests in Lansing against police brutality and the killing of George Floyd. Now, those protests have turned into calls to defund the Lansing Police and for Mayor Andy Schor to resign.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

More than one hundred protesters gathered on the state capitol steps Sunday marking a week of protests in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, a black Minneapolis man, by a white police officer.

Early Monday morning, crews of volunteers and small business owners worked to board up broken windows, sweep shattered glass, and scrub spray paint off of buildings that protesters damaged in the Sunday protest.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

Hundreds gathered at the Michigan State Capitol Sunday to protest the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who was killed after White police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for minutes.

Protesters marched around the Capitol, down Michigan Avenue, and to East Lansing and back throughout the day—remaining largely non-violent. However, as daylight began to fade, a switch flipped and the protest turned violent leaving broken windows, a burnt carcass of a car, and damage to downtown businesses.

Hundreds of protesters marched at the capitol and around Lansing throughout the day Sunday protesting the police killing of George Floyd and police brutality.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

 This post was last updated Sunday, May 31st at 11:30 p.m.

Hundreds gathered at the Michigan State Capitol Sunday to protest the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who was killed after White Police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for  minutes.

Fair & Equal MI along with two Democrat state lawmakers, the campaign is suing the Michigan Secretary of State, Board of Canvassers, and Director of Elections to forestall the end of their campaign after falling more than 162,000 signatures short.
James Durkee / flickr creative commons

As ballot measure initiatives across the country fizzled out during the coronavirus pandemic Fair and Equal Michigan pivoted to gathering electronic signatures.

But, when Wednesday’s deadline came to turn in signatures to be vetted for a place on Novembers’ ballot, the gay-rights campaign fighting for non-discrimination protections fell more than 162,000 signatures short.

Now, along with two Democrat state lawmakers, the campaign is suing the Michigan Secretary of State, Board of Canvassers, and Director of Elections to forestall the end of their campaign.

Michael Flynn III, center, was one of six people who escorted Rep. Sarah Anthony (D-Lansing) into the capitol after heavily armed white protesters stood above lawmakers at capitol protests against the stay at home order.
Courtesy of Michael Lynn III via Facebook

Two weeks ago, when the Liberate Michigan protest spilled into the Capitol building, armed protesters stood over state lawmakers. 

Updated at 12:09 p.m. ET

Despite heavy rain, armed protesters gathered Thursday at the State Capitol in Michigan in what the organizing group, Michigan United for Liberty, has branded "judgment day."

This was the third planned demonstration since Michigan has been under a stay-at-home-order from Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The prevalence rate, or rate of COVID-19 modeled per 100,000 people, is three times higher for Black people and roughly four times higher for Asian people than White people in Lansing’s 48911 zipcode.
Courtesy of the Ingham County Health Department

As Michigan moves into its third month of the coronavirus pandemic, the curve in Ingham County is flattening. Now that testing is more widespread, officials are getting additional data that helps them understand the epidemic in their own communities, and plan for the next stages.

Health officials in Ingham County are casting a wider net of testing, and now they’re getting back data that shows COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting Black and Asian people in the 48911 zip-code on the southside of Lansing.

gavel
bestlawdir / Public Domain

Governor Gretchen Whitmer is facing several legal challenges over her use of emergency powers in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Republican leaders in the Michigan legislature filed the latest lawsuit Wednesday against the Democratic leader of the state.

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