Abigail Censky

Politics/Government Reporter

Abigail Censky is the Politics & Government reporter at WKAR.

Abigail joined WKAR in December 2018.

Prior to joining WKAR, Abigail served as news intern at St. Louis Public Radio, covering the Missouri 2018 midterm elections; and covered Colorado politics as a reporter with the Colorado Springs Gazette.

Abigail Censky has a bachelor's degree from Colorado College.

States are beginning to plan to pivot to conduct largely vote by mail elections during the coronavirus pandemic. In Michigan, two to three million voters are expected to vote from home.
newamericamedia.org

Tuesday Michigan is holding the first election since announcing its first two cases of COVID-19 the night of the state’s presidential primary. The May elections will serve as a soft-opening for how Michiganders will cast their votes in August and November.

While lawmakers met to deliberate whether or not to renew Governor Whitmer’s emergency declaration inside the capitol building, protesters outside decried the stay-at-home order as unconstitutional.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

While lawmakers met to deliberate whether or not to renew Governor Whitmer’s emergency declaration inside the capitol building, protesters outside decried the stay-at-home order as unconstitutional.

Lawmakers returned to Lansing for the second time during the stay-at-home order to create an oversight committee into the state's COVID-19 response and vote on bills aimed at limiting the Governor's emergency powers.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

Legislators wore homemade masks and went through temperature screening before entering the Capitol for the second time under the stay-at-home order. Republican leaders from both chambers called lawmakers back to Lansing on short notice to vote on an oversight committee into the state’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Following protests in Ohio and North Carolina, conservative protesters in Michigan took to the state capital Wednesday to rally against stay-at-home orders. Workers who want to go back to their jobs argue the measures are excessive.

But in one of the states with the highest number of coronavirus cases in the country, Michigan’s Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer argues the orders are needed for public health and that protesters may have made the situation worse.

Several thousand cars flooded the streets around the state Capitol in Lansing, Mich., on Wednesday to protest the governor's extended stay-at-home order. Cars jammed the streets around the Capitol building, filling the air with a cacophony of honking. People draped in American and "Don't Tread on Me" flags blared "We're Not Gonna Take It" and "God Bless The USA" out of car stereos.

Coronavirus illustration
Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS / CDC

As Michigan nears the predicted apex of the coronavirus pandemic, some areas of the state have faired far better than hard-hit Southeast Michigan and Detroit. But the whole state won’t peak at the same time. For outstate areas like Ingham County—with 254 cases and a population of more than 290,000 –it’s virtually impossible to predict when cases of COVID-19 will peak, and how long life here may be disrupted.

Michigan's lawmakers returned to the Capitol on Tuesday as the state recorded its highest daily number of COVID-19-related deaths in 24 hours. The legislature convened despite the warnings from Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and public health officials who've called for limited gatherings to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

As they entered the Capitol, each lawmaker underwent a health screening and temperature check. Many donned homemade masks while the lieutenant governor presided over the Senate wearing an "Everybody vs. COVID-19" shirt.

By Friday afternoon the state’s confirmed cases of COVID-19 exceeded 12,000—with more than 88 percent of cases falling in and around metro Detroit. The state of Michigan now has more cases of COVID-19 than the nation of South Korea.
Courtesy of the Office of the Governor

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer began the week, mourning the passing of more than 100 Michiganders, including Democratic state Representative Isaac Robinson who died at age 44 from suspected complications with COVID-19; Whitmer ended the week fresh off the cancellation of school—desperate for more equipment, health workers, and considering an extension of the stay at home order that has shuttered life as we know it across the state.

Michigan is now the state with the fourth most cases of COVID-19—behind New York, New Jersey, and California. The states’ top doctor says Michigan is weeks away from peak infection rates, and the state is already facing severe shortages of equipment.
Courtesy of the Office of the Governor

Michigan is now the state with the fourth most cases of COVID-19—behind New York, New Jersey, and California. As of Monday afternoon, the state had more than 6,000 cases. Michigan is now in the trenches of battle—without enough troops or ammunition to confront the surge it’s facing.

Courtesy Governor Gretchen Whitmer

Monday morning Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued a stay-at-home order for residents in the state to slow the spread of COVID19. Michigan is now the state with the fifth most cases—behind California, New Jersey, New York, and Washington. WKAR’s Politics reporter Abigail Censky joined All Things Considered Host Karel Vega via phone to break down what you can and can’t do under the order Below are highlights of their conversation:

How did we get here?

Pages