Scott Horsley

Scott Horsley is NPR's Chief Economics Correspondent. He reports on ups and downs in the national economy as well as fault lines between booming and busting communities.

Horsley spent a decade on the White House beat, covering both the Trump and Obama administrations. Before that, he was a San Diego-based business reporter for NPR, covering fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He also reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Before joining NPR in 2001, Horsley worked for NPR Member stations in San Diego and Tampa, as well as commercial radio stations in Boston and Concord, New Hampshire. Horsley began his professional career as a production assistant for NPR's Morning Edition.

Horsley earned a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and an MBA from San Diego State University. He lives in Washington, DC, with his dog, Rosie.

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This is an extraordinary moment and an extraordinary morning in Washington, D.C. Funeral services are about to take place for the late President George H.W. Bush. And here are some of the sounds we heard in Washington moments ago.

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The president's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, should not get jail time, prosecutors are now saying.

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As Congress prepares to debate a year-end spending bill and President Trump prepares for trade talks with China's President Xi Jinping, these are some terms you're likely to hear used — and occasionally misused — by politicians and pundits. Bone up on your political and economic vocabulary so you'll sound smart on the holiday party circuit.

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Updated at 4:33 p.m. ET

President Trump threatened to cut subsidies for General Motors, in retaliation for the carmaker's decision to idle five North American auto plants and lay off some 14,000 workers.

"The U.S. saved General Motors, and this is the THANKS we get!" Trump tweeted on Tuesday, referring to the federal government's rescue of GM and Chrysler-Fiat during the depths of the recession nearly a decade ago.

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow also expressed disappointment after meeting with GM's CEO, Mary Barra, on Monday.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

President Trump declared on Tuesday that his administration will remain a "steadfast partner" of Saudi Arabia, despite the CIA's assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman personally approved the killing last month of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

"Maybe he did and maybe he didn't," Trump said of the crown prince's knowledge of the killing.

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Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

President Trump and televised spectacle go together like peas and carrots. And those just happen to be the names of the unflappable turkeys that Trump pardoned — on camera — Tuesday afternoon.

Conservative lawyer George Conway says he no longer feels comfortable in the Republican Party. And he is urging fellow conservatives to speak up more loudly, when they see President Trump challenging the rule of law.

Conway's frequent criticism of the president attracts outsize attention because he is married to White House counselor Kellyanne Conway.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

A king, a senator and the "Sultan of Swat" were honored at the White House on Friday.

President Trump presented the nation's highest civilian honor to seven people, including Elvis Presley and Babe Ruth.

The president highlighted Ruth's legendary baseball prowess, his contributions to orphanages and other charities, and his colorful off-field antics.

Updated at 3:54 p.m. ET

President Trump defended his selection of acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker on Friday as new questions arose about Whitaker's fitness for the post and whether his appointment is legal.

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The Trump administration says it is changing a U.S. asylum rule. A big question is whether that rule change is within the law.

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