All Things Considered on AM 870 NewsTalk

Weekdays, 4pm - 8pm

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert SiegelMichele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone. Stone, just to remind everyone, is the Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. He was due to report to federal prison next week to begin a three-year term. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this case and is with us now.

Hey, Ryan.

RYAN LUCAS, BYLINE: Hi there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone. Stone, just to remind everyone, is the Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. He was due to report to federal prison next week to begin a three-year term. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this case and is with us now.

Hey, Ryan.

RYAN LUCAS, BYLINE: Hi there.

Across the country, students of color have been demanding change from their schools. At one Denver school, the push for a more inclusive and diverse curriculum came last year, from a group of African American high school students at Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Early College.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone. Stone, just to remind everyone, is the Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. He was due to report to federal prison next week to begin a three-year term. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this case and is with us now.

Hey, Ryan.

RYAN LUCAS, BYLINE: Hi there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone. Stone, just to remind everyone, is the Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. He was due to report to federal prison next week to begin a three-year term. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this case and is with us now.

Hey, Ryan.

RYAN LUCAS, BYLINE: Hi there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

President Trump has commuted the prison sentence of his longtime friend Roger Stone. Stone, just to remind everyone, is the Republican operative who was convicted of lying to Congress about his efforts to contact WikiLeaks during Russia's interference in the 2016 election. He was due to report to federal prison next week to begin a three-year term. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has been following this case and is with us now.

Hey, Ryan.

RYAN LUCAS, BYLINE: Hi there.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Pirette McKamey is fighting for anti-racist education.

Over her more than 30 years as an educator, the principal at Mission High School in San Francisco spent a decade leading an anti-racism committee.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Enough is enough. That's what we're hearing from young people as they demand change not just from police departments and legislators but also from their educators. Petitions with thousands of signatures are circulating all over the country now, urging schools to incorporate what's called anti-racist education into their curricula. Here's Angela Frezza and Daniel Afolabi, former students from West Lafayette, Ind., who started a petition there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Enough is enough. That's what we're hearing from young people as they demand change not just from police departments and legislators but also from their educators. Petitions with thousands of signatures are circulating all over the country now, urging schools to incorporate what's called anti-racist education into their curricula. Here's Angela Frezza and Daniel Afolabi, former students from West Lafayette, Ind., who started a petition there.

Pages