Serving Up Science

Wednesdays during All Things Considered

The series all about food: where it comes from and how it impacts our health and our planet. History buff, foodie and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum serves up a side of science and history, explores the reasons behind the recipe, and offers some tasty tips on your favorite foods.

WKAR host Karel Vega joins Sheril for the weekly podcast and broadcast Wednesdays during All Things Considered on 90.5 FM in mid-Michigan. 

Produced in cooperation with Food @ MSU.

ALSO... Coming soon: Serving Up Science on YouTube! SUBSCRIBE NOW! New episodes ahead this fall.

Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

Yes, you read that right. Noodles. Last week you heard science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum make Posole. This week, WKAR's Karel Vega tries his hand at a classic jewish dessert made with cottage cheese and noodles. In part 2 of their recipe exchange, Karel steps outside of his comfort zone, and finds himself pleasantly surprised with the results.   


Sheril Kirshenbaum / WKAR-MSU

Have you ever felt like your recipes are lacking diversity? WKAR's Karel Vega and science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum challenged each other to make a dish from the other's heritage. In part 1 of their recipe exchance, Sheril  tries her hand at making pozole - a traditional Mexican stew, with a recipe courtesy of Karel's mom.


Joseph Siffred Duplessis / Wikimedia Creative Commons

Did you know Benjamin Franklin started a revolution to eat more potatoes in France? A small history lesson on this episode of Serving Up Science as history buff Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss the founding father's contributions to the world of food.


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

By adding a molecule known as heme into the patty, the creators of the vegan "Impossible Burger" claim it contains the aroma and taste of meat. In this episode of Serving Up Science Sheril and Karel eat the "Impossible Burger" to find out if it lives up to the hype.


Gluten-free bread
Pixabay

Eating gluten-free has become one of the biggest diet trends of the past few years. Celebrities promote the diet, and some fitness gurus even claim going gluten-free gives a person more energy. Is it right for you? 


Sheril with Question Marks
Illustration / WKAR-MSU

Where do you look for information on what you eat? Nearly half of Americans don't trust academic scientists when it comes to information about food. Instead, close to a third of Americans put more trust in friends, family and social media.


food waste in barrels
ComArtSci-MSU

Nearly half of the food in the United States gets thrown away. Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR All Things Considered host Karel Vega discuss food waste: its impact on the environment and economy, and ways to reduce it.


portrait: Kirshenbaum
Amanda Pinckney / WKAR-MSU

Welcome to Serving up Science -- the series all about food: where it comes from and how it impacts our health and our planet.


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