criminal justice

Rosemarie Aquilina Zoom image
Zoom image

Ingham County Circuit Judge Rosemarie Aquilina rose to national prominence as she handled the Larry Nassar sex abuse case. As a writer, she has tackled fiction as the author of three novels. Now, Judge Aquilina has published an autobiography called Just Watch Me, initially available only as an audiobook.

WKAR’s Scott Pohl talks with her about the project.


The Lansing city council has decided not to include a proposed police funding cut in its budget recommendation to the mayor.


Black Lives Matter protestors
Abigail Censky, WKAR

A new policy in Ingham County will affect how prosecutors examine and charge people with resisting arrest.

Police Lights
publicdomainpictures

A growing group of Republicans and Democrats in the state Legislature says it’s time to stop charging 17-year-old criminal suspects as adults. 

Gavel
s_falkow / flickr creative commons

Michigan has suspended the license of a doctor who authorities say may have endangered patients and the public by performing liposuctions in a storage building.

Takata's defective air bags have made headlines in recent years.  Now, a plea deal has led to fines and more.

The U.S. Supreme Court building
Wikimedia Commons

In 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that mandatory life in prison without parole for juvenile offenders was unconstitutional. On Monday, the court said that ruling applies to people currently serving sentences for crimes they committed as minors. Current State talks to both a prison reform proponent and a victims’ rights advocate about their reaction to the decision. 

Maurice Henry Carter and Doug Tjapkes photo
Courtesy photo / Doug Tjapkes

The true story of Maurice Henry Carter, who was wrongfully convicted and served 29 years for shooting a Benton Harbor police officer, was turned into a play that will be performed tonight and Sunday in the Lansing area. We speak with director Lisa Biggs,  and Doug Tjapkes, the man who worked for ten years to help free Carter.


April Zeoli photo
Courtesy photo / MSU School of Criminal Justice

Victims of domestic violence often suffer in silence, hiding their abuse from friends and family. But even when they do speak up or seek help, women who have been abused are still at risk of sometimes fatal violence. We talk to April Zeoli, an associate professor in MSU’s School of Criminal Justice, about why Michigan women are particularly at risk.


Is gang violence infectious? MSU study suggests yes.

Aug 31, 2015
picture of April Zeoli
Michigan State University

A new study out of MSU adds credence to the idea that some kinds of violence are actually predictable in the way they spread through a community. Associate Professor of criminal justice April Zeoli talks about her research tracking gang violence as an infectious disease. 

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