Inauguration

President Biden.

That's going to take some getting used to after these past four years.

The new president was sworn in Wednesday and made an inaugural address aimed at unity. Biden didn't sugarcoat, however, the hurdles to bringing Americans together, and he leaned into the challenges the U.S. faces, as he sees it.

Here are six takeaways from Biden's inauguration:

1. A starkly different tone was set.

When Amanda Gorman, a 22-year-old poet from Los Angeles, took to the stage on Wednesday, it was immediately clear why the new president had chosen her as his inaugural poet.

Gorman echoed, in dynamic and propulsive verse, the same themes that Biden has returned to again and again and that he wove throughout his inaugural address: unity, healing, grief and hope, the painful history of American experience and the redemptive power of American ideals.

Caroline Amenabar/NPR; GPA Photo Archive/Flickr; Gage Skidmore/Flickr

Joe Biden will become the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday, having defeated Donald Trump in an acrimonious, divisive election last November.

Updated at 10:00 p.m. ET

Joe Biden became the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday, having defeated Donald Trump in an acrimonious, divisive election last November.

Biden was sworn in alongside Vice President-elect Kamala Harris in an unusual inauguration ceremony, conducted amid the ongoing coronavirus crisis and heightened physical security risks.

Updated at 12:22 p.m. ET

Joe Biden addressed the nation for the first time as its 46th president on Wednesday. Biden spoke at a scaled-down event before a divided nation still reeling from the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and from the coronavirus pandemic that has now killed more than 400,000 Americans.

But his remarks were ones of hope.

Updated at 8:35 p.m. ET

White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters that President Biden has signed 15 executive actions, part of a flurry of steps he plans to take in the coming days to address his top policy priorities — and to roll back some of former President Donald Trump's initiatives.

White House officials had originally told reporters there would be 17 actions signed, focused on addressing the COVID-19 crisis, the economy, racial justice and climate change.

Courtesy Julie Giroux

On Wednesday, January 20th, at the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, a 1st will be taking place. The first piece by a woman composer to be played during the inauguration ceremony itself.  The Marine Band has been playing every inauguration back through Thomas Jefferson. Their current conductor and commander, Col. Jason K. Fettig selected Julie Giroux’s “Integrity Fanfare and March” to be played as Kamala Harris walks up to the podium. But as Giroux told me the evening before the ceremony, her memory needed to be jogged.

Updated at 1:10p.m. ET

The inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th president of the United States is going to look vastly different than those of his predecessors, given the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and heightened security concerns after a mob of pro-Trump extremists violently breached the U.S. Capitol two weeks ago.

Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson vowed to protect all Michiganders during her inauguration speech on January 1, 2019. 


Jocelyn Benson, Michigan's first Democratic secretary of state in more than 20 years gives her inaugural remarks.
WKAR

During her inauguration speech on January 1, 2019, Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson vowed to protect the votes and democracy of the state's voters. 


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