Nature

Snowy owl photo
Courtesy photo / Nova Mackentley, www.nightflightimages.com

There are over 200 different species of owls, but only one that can survive the temperatures of the Arctic: the snowy owl. A small number of these owls make appearances in the Great Lakes region every year. This year, several came to Michigan earlier than expected and they were malnourished. We get an update on the snowy owls from two experts in the field.


Operation Wild

Jun 30, 2015
Panda in the field
Helen Quinn / BBC

Wed. July 1-15 at 8pm on WKAR-HD 23.1 | Join veterinarian teams around the world as they undertake groundbreaking operations to try to save animals' lives.

MSU wild plant expert: eat this, not that

Jun 10, 2015
http://msutoday.msu.edu/

Even the most casual cable TV viewers have, on occasion, been led to ask themselves "How long could I survive in the wild without food? What could I eat?" Peter Carrington will offer those kind of insights tomorrow at Michigan State University’s Beal Botanical Garden. He's the assistant curator of the Beal Garden, where he is the edible and toxic plant specialist. He’s also been an assistant instructor in the MSU plant biology department. His free, 40-minute session is called "Weeds you can eat, and NOT."

April Van Buren/WKAR

If you’re planning your summer vacation, you’re probably going to be booking a hotel or summer cottage soon. And so will some of the winged visitors to the Horticultural Demonstration Gardens here on the MSU campus. But, lucky for them, the bees at MSU’s “bee hotels” won’t be needing reservations.

Flickr - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

The conversation around climate change often focuses on how it will disrupt human life. Scientists warn that food shortages, flooding in coastal cities, and deadly heatwaves are just a few of the potentially devastating consequences of a warming planet. But humans aren’t the only ones at risk. Even small changes in temperature could drastically alter the native habitats of plants and animals across the globe, including here in Michigan.

Exploring MI wildflowers at Harris Nature Center

Jun 1, 2015
Courtesy Harris Nature Center

From Celandine Poppy to Jack-In-The-Pulpit, Michigan wildflowers are in full bloom this time of year. Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. you can look and learn all about Michigan blossoms in a class at Meridian Township’s Harris Nature Center.

Christopher N. Hull

Dozens of bird lovers have journeyed to Lansing’s Potter Park Zoo recently to view the area’s first nesting bald eagles in decades. The nest sits in a large tree in a marshy area in the middle of the Red Cedar river. What’s the likelihood that the birds could make that area a permanent home? Biologist Christopher Hull has his doubts. He has vield the nest and the eagles a number of times, and he thinks the eagles may be in the process of abandoning the nest now.

Birdwatching 101 at the Harris Nature Center

Apr 28, 2015
Courtesy Harris Nature Center

From March Madness to April showers, the signs of spring have been making their arrival in Michigan these past few weeks. You’ve probably also noticed a few more bird songs accompanying those first rays of morning light. Bird enthusiasts such as Harris Nature Center bird naturalist Clare Bratton have been venturing out more and more lately, binoculars at the ready.

Flickr - Don Faulkner

All over North America, bird watchers are looking to spot an elusive species. The rusty blackbird has experienced huge population declines, and scientists aren’t quite sure why. Current State’s Kevin Lavery goes on a “Rusty Blackbird Blitz” in northern Clinton County.

New MSU research offers rare glimpse into panda life

Apr 13, 2015
Wolong Nature Preserve

Pandas, with their distinctive markings and decidedly cuddly appearance, are an international symbol for conservation. But because wild pandas are incredibly elusive, little research has been done on their behaviors in the wild. For a long time, the Chinese government outlawed using radio collars to track pandas. Now, a team of MSU researchers are among the first to be allowed to use GPS to track wild pandas in China, and they found out some surprising things about these elusive creatures.

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