Representative Elissa Slotkin

Elissa Slotkin / Facebook

A man held up a hostile poster a few rows behind Michigan Rep. Elissa Slotkin as she spoke. On other side of the room, allies hoisted a Slotkin-friendly banner. But what was perhaps most striking at Slotkin’s first town hall since President Donald Trump’s impeachment was a newfound sense of civility.

Rep. Elissa Slotkin is co-sponsoring legislation attempting to overturn Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' rule changes to Title IX.
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

Representative Elissa Slotkin from Michigan's 8th congressional district has introduced legislation to stop controversial Title IX changes from taking effect. The program requires that schools which receive federal funding not discriminate on the basis of sex. Since the proposed changes were announced, the program has received more than 120,000 public comments - mostly opposing the move. 

WKAR's Karel Vega spoke with Representative Slotkin about the legislation. Below are highlights of their conversation.

Michigan Capitol
Alec Gerstenberger/WKAR-MSU

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said Monday she wants to pause the implementation of work requirements for adults in Michigan’s Medicaid expansion program until a lawsuit is resolved, but doing so would require an agreement from Republican lawmakers.

Five members of the Michigan congressional delegation introduced bicameral, bipartisan legislation that would require university leaders to review sex abuse cases involving employees Tuesday.
Liam James Doyle / NPR

A bipartisan group of Michigan’s congressional delegation announced two bills Tuesday that would require reports of sexual assault involving a university employee be reviewed by the highest levels of college administrators.

Lawmakers said the legislation is a direct response to the Larry Nassar abuse scandal at Michigan State University.

Monday marked the 31st day of the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history. If the government is not reopened by Friday, 800,000 federal workers will miss their second paycheck.
Credit Flickr | Leo Lung

Hundreds of people gathered to celebrate the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. for the annual MLK Day luncheon in Lansing, but for several Democratic lawmakers in town from Washington, the 31-day shutdown cast a shadow over the festivities.