Science & Technology

Science and Technology

Lansing home demolition photo
WKAR File Photo

The demolition of abandoned homes can improve a neighborhood, but the disposal of the materials has an impact on the environment. At Michigan State University this week, proponents of a small but growing movement assembled to discuss ways to re-purpose most of that stuff.


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

By adding a molecule known as heme into the patty, the creators of the vegan "Impossible Burger" claim it contains the aroma and taste of meat. In this episode of Serving Up Science Sheril and Karel eat the "Impossible Burger" to find out if it lives up to the hype.


Gluten-free bread
Pixabay

Eating gluten-free has become one of the biggest diet trends of the past few years. Celebrities promote the diet, and some fitness gurus even claim going gluten-free gives a person more energy. Is it right for you? 


Gary Blievernicht photo with new WKAR-TV transmitters
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

In a couple of weeks, television viewers who use an over-the-air antenna to watch WKAR-TV will need to re-scan their equipment in order to continue watching.


Earthquake epicenter April 2018
US Geological Survey

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting a 3.6-magnitude earthquake centered in southern Canada that also was felt in suburban Detroit.

Sheril with Question Marks
Illustration / WKAR-MSU

Where do you look for information on what you eat? Nearly half of Americans don't trust academic scientists when it comes to information about food. Instead, close to a third of Americans put more trust in friends, family and social media.


food waste in barrels
ComArtSci-MSU

Nearly half of the food in the United States gets thrown away. Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR All Things Considered host Karel Vega discuss food waste: its impact on the environment and economy, and ways to reduce it.


portrait: Kirshenbaum
Amanda Pinckney / WKAR-MSU

Welcome to Serving up Science -- the series all about food: where it comes from and how it impacts our health and our planet.


Green snowplow lights photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

The Michigan Department of Transportation is gearing up for winter. Preparations include getting snow plows ready to hit the roads and highways of the state. Keeping roadways as clear as possible is crucial, but so is the safety of plow drivers and motorists. This year, the preparations include an important new safety feature.


PhD student Osama Ennasar and undergrad student Camille Emig work on GRACE.
Katie Cook / WKAR-MSU

MSU researchers are using a grant from the National Science Foundation to continue their study and construction of underwater robots.

 


Karel Vega / WKAR-MSU

For the next few days, WKAR reporters are sharing how technology built or tested here in Michigan may change our lives. But some of the most useful technology for modern day communication is over a century old. WKAR's Karel Vega visited a dedicated group on Michigan State University’s campus devoted to ham radio.

Spoof fingerprints photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Fingerprint identification technology has advanced to the point where you probably have it on the phone you carry. A team in the Michigan State University College of Engineering is working to improve the security of fingerprint recognition systems, and a big part of their effort aims to learn more about fake prints that could be used against you.


light imaging and detection
CANVAS Program / Michigan State University

Just as it did in the 20th century, Michigan is leading a transportation revolution in the 21st. 

At the former Willow Run bomber plant near Ypsilanti, the new American Center for Mobility is emerging as one of the world’s premiere test sites for self-driving cars.  The center is working with Michigan State University and other institutions across the state to train the next generation of autonomous vehicle engineers.

 


Rob Zondervan and the Clean Case Mobile Device Cover photo
Scott Pohl / WKAR-MSU

Cell phones are dirty things. According to some media reports, they’re dirtier than toilet seats. Not something you want in an operating room, that’s for sure.


truck and bridge
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The day of the driverless car is gaining ground.  Fast. 

 

What was once a science fiction fantasy is exploding into a legitimate industry.  Connected vehicles have caught the attention of such companies as Tesla, Uber and even Google.  Now, add the U.S. military to that list.  In Michigan, an Army research and development lab is experimenting with cargo hauling trucks to learn how to run automated supply convoys.  The goal is to save time, fuel and human lives.  

 


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