Serving Up Science

On this edition of Current State: New pipeline protection plans; Bird Scooters land on sidewalks & impound lots; MSU students rally for Indonesia; Little Rock Nine member Ernest Green; Studying political polarization 1973-now; Plastics in our Great Lakes; dental health and a Jackson teacher's "Random Act of Kindness."

  

Dentist
Pixabay Creative Commons

Brushing and flossing are both vital for maintaining strong teeth, but there are more ways to keep your mouth, and your body, healthy. One way is being mindful of what you eat. On this episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega speak with Dr. Jason Mashni about oral health.


On this week's Current State: how the Larry Nassar & Flint Water Crisis are now part of the Michigan governor's campaigns; how the political marriage gap is closing; enthusiasm among young voters; resources for sexual assault victims triggered by Dr. Ford's testimony; grey wolves relocated in the UP; and a movie cameo by the Jackson Symphony music director.


On this week's show: Michigan's Governors Race; Lawsuit alleging a 1992 sexual assault by Larry Nassar and cover-up; Political climate affecting international students at MSU; The Great American Read; "talking" sidewalks in Lansing; Archived interview with Dr. Lena Wen; the history of apples in America.


Red Delicious Apple Dethroned
Pixabay Creative Commons / Photo editing by Amanda Barberena

Red Delicious apples have been around since the end of the 19th century. They were a favorite due to their dark red color, suggesting the apple's ripeness. On this episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss America’s favorite apples.


Whole Grain Bread
Pixabay Creative Commons

Low carb diets seem like a good idea on the surface, but all nutrients are necessary in moderation. On this episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega speak with Dr. Robin Tucker, assistant professor in the department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Michigan State University, about the pros and cons of a low carb diet.


Hamburger
Daniel Carlbom / Flickr creative commons

On top of farm-raised vs. wild-caught, and GMO vs. non-GMO, you may soon be faced with another decision when buying meat at the grocery store: farm-raised vs....laboratory-grown. On this week's Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss the looming possibility of meat made in a petri dish. 


spoon with sugar
Marco Verch / Flickr Creative Commons

How does sugar really affect our health? On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega bring light to a study done on the health effects of sugar, a study that Big Sugar tried to sweep under the rug. 


Creative Commons

The idea of genetically modified food makes a lot of people nervous. These concerns are usually due to a misunderstanding of how genetic modification works. With an ever-growing global population, these foods will become essential to the survival of many. This week, Science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega break down how scientists are using the new technology CRISPR to grow better food.


Mike Mozart / Flickr Creative Commons

In an attempt to derail its biggest competitor's new product, Coca-Cola devised a marketing plan with sinister motivations. In today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega unwrap the short history of Crystal Pepsi and the plan to get it off the market. 


Melissa / Flickr Creative Commons

If your kids packed their own lunch, what would it look like? After speaking to the kids at the Spartan Child Development Center in East Lansing, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega say it might be healthier than you'd imagine. On this week's episode of Serving Up Science, Sheril and Karel interviewed some 5-year olds to find out how much they really know about healthy eating. 


Tailgating grill photo
Andrew Sprung / flickr creative commons

Independence Day is the biggest grilling day of the year, and grill-masters all over the country are going to be putting their skills to the test. While grilling is an age-old technique, you can look to science to perfect your craft. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, science writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega uncover the science behind making the best (and safest!) grilled meat.


Rebecca Siegel / Flickr creative commons

More than just a millennial foodie trend, pickling has roots that go all the way back to ancient Mesopotamia. What was once a tool used to preserve foods in the harshest of climates is now filling mason jars in refrigerators all over the country. On today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega dive deep into the origins of pickling, and give some tasty advice to amateur picklers.


kittenfc / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that 48 million Americans are affected by food-borne illnesses every year? Luckily, on today's episode of Serving Up Science, Science Writer Sheril Kirshenbaum and WKAR's Karel Vega discuss how you can avoid that fate. Whether it be washing your hands for longer than you think, or being extra careful about separating your foods, there are lots of ways you can make sure dinner is yummy and safe. 


Our entire show is focused on Michigan Technology – changing the way we drive, we live and our health. 

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