health insurance

AG Bill Schuette
File photo / WKAR-MSU

Republican Bill Schuette said Wednesday that he wouldn't undo Michigan's expansion of Medicaid coverage if he were governor, refuting Democrats' accusation that electing him would lead to hundreds of thousands of adults losing their government health insurance.

Doctor's Office
Flickr - Susan

Time is running out for Michigan residents to weigh in on changes to the Healthy Michigan insurance plan. Capital correspondent Cheyna Roth reports the comment period ends Sunday.


City of Lansing seal and flags displayed
WKAR-MSU

More than 500,000 able-bodied, nonelderly adults in Michigan's Medicaid expansion program would have to work or meet related requirements to keep qualifying for government health insurance under a revised bill that cleared a major legislative hurdle on Wednesday and is expected to become law.

Capitol building
File Photo / WKAR-MSU

Able-bodied Medicaid recipients in Michigan may soon have to choose between finding a job or losing health insurance.

Vaccine photo
Pan American Health Organization PAHO / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of Michigan's health system is being criticized for a concierge medical care pilot program that gives patients perks for a large annual fee.

Vaccine photo
Pan American Health Organization PAHO / Flickr Creative Commons

Premiums will rise an average of 27 percent for the hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents who buy their own health insurance.

Governor Rick Snyder says he hopes Congress moves quickly to restore health insurance subsidies that were eliminated last week by President Trump. The governor is concerned about the effect on rates for low-income families. 


Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

MI healthcare expert updates Obamacare landscape

Dec 9, 2015
Stethoscope photo
Flickr/surroundsound5000

Americans are again enrolling in health insurance plans under Obamacare. We learn what’s new, what’s changed and what challenges are ahead for the Affordable Care Act and Healthy Michigan from Marianne Udow-Phillips of Ann Arbor’s Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation.


Todd Tennis photo
Courtesy image / Ingham County Board of Commissioners

Ingham County officials may be nearing a resolution over how to provide medical services to the county’s neediest residents. That’s been an issue since participation plunged and surpluses soared at the Ingham Health Plan. Current State speaks with Ingham County Commissioner Todd Tennis about the road ahead.


MI analyst praises SCOTUS health care ruling

Jun 26, 2015

Current State talks with analyst Marianne Udow-Phillips about the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the Affordable Care Act.


Naeyaert and Daman with Bashore
Scott Pohl / WKAR

Continued funding for the Ingham Health Plan debated as U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare looms. Current State speaks with Tim Daman of the Greater Lansing Regional Chamber of Commerce and County Commissioner Robin Naeyaert.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

Since the launch of Obamacare, close to 300,000 Michigan residents have enrolled in health insurance plans offered through the state exchange.  

Many of them are now watching the U.S. Supreme Court closely.   A decision in the the case ‘King v Burwell’ is due by the end of the month.  It will determine whether or not federal subsidies, which help pay premiums for about three-quarters of those participants, will continue.

Scott Pohl/WKAR

The Ingham County Health Plan was created in 1998 to help the region’s most vulnerable residents help pay for medical care. At one time, the program served around 14,000 people. But after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, many of those people became eligible for insurance, either through the expanded Medicaid program or the private insurance market. That means that the yearly $3.2 million dollar millage for the program that voters renewed last fall is supporting a much smaller program.

Stethoscope photo
Flickr/surroundsound5000

Medicaid benefits used to be available mostly to low-income children, pregnant women, and disabled adults in Michigan. But that changed in 2013 when Michigan voted to use federal funds from the Affordable Care Act to extend those benefits to more people. Gov. Rick Snyder was a major force behind the legislation, saying it would mean lower healthcare costs and more federal dollars for Michigan. Healthy Michigan, the state’s expanded Medicaid program, has enrolled nearly 600,000 people to date. But the future of the program depends on the Department of Health and Human Services getting a waiver from the federal government.

Pages