slavery

The train station in Jackson is being recognized by Amtrak for its role in the Underground Railroad, the system that helped escaped slaves reach freedom in the north.

State Sen. Mike Shirkey (R) Clarklake
senatormikeshirkey.com

Democratic lawmakers are criticizing remarks by Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey (R-Clarklake). 

Underground Railroad, Vandalia, wagon
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

The Underground Railroad was a salvation from unrelenting violence forced upon millions of African-Americans since 1619. A southwest Michigan community served as a stop on the way to freedom.


people eating lunch
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

The city of Lansing has kicked off its annual Juneteenth celebration.

 


Journalist's Book Examines Slavery's Connection to 2018

Feb 12, 2018
Reginald Hardwick / WKAR-MSU

WKAR's Reginald Hardwick talked with Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley about her new book The Burden African-Americans and the Enduring Impact of Slavery. During a recent visit to Michigan State University, Riley explained why the lack of discussion about slavery and its affects on African-Americans are still being felt today and hurting the United States' ability to move forward as a whole. 


Manumission photo 1
Courtesy photo / Ben Hall

The Michigan Historical Center recently got a special donation: the manumission papers of Frank Demas, who likely bought his freedom from a slave owner in Kentucky before settling in Mason, were donated by his family. We hear from state archivist Mark Harvey and Ben Hall, a Lansing musician and descendant of Demas, about this rare piece of history.


Preservationist sleeps in former slave-dwellings

Sep 23, 2013
Courtesy preservation.org

In parts of the country, there are an unknown number of old dwellings that once were the homes of slaves. For Joe McGill, preserving these structures has become a mission.

Flickr

 Today, Lansing kicks off the opening events of the 20th annual Juneteenth celebration, which is a three-day festival celebrating the emancipation of African-Americans from slavery. The holiday has been officially recognized in the state since 2005 when Gov. Jennifer Granholm declared the third Saturday in June to be "Juneteenth National Freedom Day."

Cheryl Benjamin, board member of the Lansing Juneteenth Committee, joins Current State to explain the holiday's origins and what the next three days have to offer.