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From our State Capitol in Lansing to the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC, WKAR is committed to explaining how the actions of lawmakers are affecting Michiganders. Political and government reporter Abigail Censky leads this section. There are also stories from Capitol correspondents Cheyna Roth, Rick Pluta and the Associated Press. As the 2020 presidential race begins, look here for reports on the role Michigan will play in electing or re-electing the president.

Report: MI Cities Lost 12 Percent Of Their Revenue In 15 Years

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Kevin Lavery
/
WKAR-MSU
Public Sector Consultants VP Tim Dempsey (left) and Michigan Municipal League Policy Development Director Shanna Draheim talk about their new revenue report Wednesday in Lansing.

A Michigan public policy research firm says long-term disinvestment by the state is hurting municipal revenues. 

 

A report by Lansing-based Public Sector Consultants surveyed 225 Michigan cities.  It finds state revenue sharing payments and municipal property tax revenues have fallen substantially since 2002. 

PSC vice-president Tim Dempsey says on average, Michigan cities are operating with 12 percent less revenue today than they did 15 years ago.

“When you have a 12 percent overall revenue decline, that’s pretty substantial,” says Dempsey.  “If you equate that into your own household budget, imagine what that would mean for you as an individual or as a family.”

The Michigan Municipal League says many cities have been forced to cut police, fire and infrastructure services to offset their losses.

The report’s authors say they hope it will be a call to action for state lawmakers to restore  revenue sharing payments to at least their 2011 levels. 

 

 

 

 

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