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Arts & Culture

Aretha Franklin's Connections To Michigan State University

Aretha Franklin
Facebook fan page of Aretha Franklin
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Aretha Franklin, singer

As the world remembers Aretha Franklin, we uncovered a few of her ties to Michigan State University.

A year after Aretha Franklin’s "A Deeper Love" began playing on radios and nightclubs across America.. the Queen of Soul came to Michigan State University.

In August of 1995, she performed at the now-defunct Michigan Festival at Munn Field.

interview_franklin_msu.jpg
Excerpt from 1986 article in Interview magazine

Could you imagine Franklin as a Spartan? In 1986, Franklin told Interview magazine she considered enrolling as a special student in music theory at MSU.

That didn’t happen but Franklin’s son Ted attended MSU and is a musician in his own right with 3 albums. 

Aretha Franklin's music quickly climbed the iTunes' charts following her death on Thursday.

Her "30 Greatest Hits" album hit the No. 1 spot, replacing Nicki Minaj's new album, while "Respect" reached No. 2 on the songs' charts.

180817_interview_magazine_franklin_cover_0.jpg
1986 Interview magazine cover featuring Franklin.

More songs from Franklin, including "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman," ''Think," ''Chain of Fools" and "I Say A Little Prayer," were in the Top 40.

The iTunes charts tracks digital sales and is updated multiple times each day.

Franklin died pancreatic cancer at age 76. She had battled undisclosed health issues in recent years, had in 2017 announced her retirement from touring.

On Friday, the MSU Museum plans to unveil what it's calling a "modest installation" honoring Franklin. 

People are encouraged to share their thoughts about the singer at noon.

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