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Eaton County students to attend ‘Mini-Medical School’ to learn about healthcare industry

school classroom
Wokandapix
/
Pixabay
Mini-Medical School is a hands-on, interactive learning session for students in grades 3-5. It's designed to get kids thinking early on about potential careers.

Some Eaton County elementary students will get a taste of the health care profession Friday at what officials call “Mini-Medical School.”

Mini-Medical School is a hands-on, interactive learning session for students in grades 3-5.

It’s designed to get kids thinking early on about potential careers.

High school students are volunteering to share information about nutrition, hygiene, exercise and other topics.

Eaton Regional Education Service Agency Superintendent Sean Williams says the dynamic between older and younger students works well.

“The younger kids trust, sometimes, the teenagers a little bit more and really feel like they’re getting some insider information,” Williams said. “It’s a win-win for our program when we can have that exposure both ways.”

Williams adds the program is part of a larger curriculum that exposes students to potential career fields.

“(There’s) a lot of exploration at this age,” Williams said. “In middle school, we start looking at more of the pathways, where if a student is interested in going into maybe auto tech or looking at a medical track or business…that’s where you would really start having that repetition.”

Eaton RESA is co-sponsoring the program alongside the Michigan Health Council.

The Mini-Medical School will take place Friday at Eaton Rapids Greyhound Intermediate School.

Kevin Lavery served as a general assignment reporter and occasional local host for Morning Edition and All Things Considered before retiring in 2023.
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