M-STEP

chairs and desks
WKAR File Photo

Michigan’s third graders showed slight improvement in their reading scores in the 2018 school year.  However, the gains are not enough to stave off criticism of the state’s early literacy efforts.

 


school hallway
WKAR File Photo

Michigan’s kids are going back to class.  This fall, more than 1 million students will step through the schoolhouse door.  Some are stepping into the spotlight.

 


chairs in classroom
flickr/technicolours

It’s testing season again.  Every April, students take a variety of standardized tests to gauge their mastery of a range of subjects.  The most commonly used assessments in Michigan are the M-STEP, the SAT and the ACT.

 


yellow school bus
flickr/Those Guys 119

Waverly Community Schools in Delta Township is re-focusing on early elementary literacy in a bid to improve its state assessment scores. In 2015, 69 percent of Waverly third graders tested as "reading-proficient" on the M-STEP.  By 2018, that number had fallen to 37.7 percent.

 


wooden blocks
Kevin Lavery / WKAR-MSU

Michigan students are back in class today. While they’re busy adjusting to their new routine, hundreds of districts across the state are studying last year’s report card. The results of the 2018 Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress, or “M-STEP” are out.  WKAR education reporter Kevin Lavery talks with Morning Edition host Emily Fox about the reading scores in mid-Michigan.

 


Flickr

Michigan is reporting slight improvement by third- and fourth-graders on the state's standardized reading test.

boy at computer
flickr/Kristine Full

This week, your children may be among thousands taking the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress, or M-STEP.  It’s the yardstick the state uses to measure a student’s proficiency in math, science, social studies and language arts. 


chairs and desks
WKAR File Photo

The state schools chief wants to let local districts experiment with student testing.  

Chalk
WKAR File Photo

The state released new test scores for grade school students today. As Cheyna Roth explains, the results brought good news and bad news.