The Road to Little Rock Special Screening and Conversation with Ernest Green

Oct 1, 2018

Thursday, Oct. 4, 2pm-3pm in WKAR Studio A | Join WKAR and MSU for a special screening of The Road to Little Rock and conversation with Ernest Green!

Member of the Little Rock Nine, Civil Rights Activist and Michigan State University Alumnus Ernest Green has been named the 2018 Homecoming Grand Marshal. Green will take part in various MSU Homecoming festivities during the week of October 1 to 6, including this special event with WKAR.

The event begins with a full screening of The Road to Little Rock followed by a conversation with Ernest Green, led by MSU Communication Arts and Sciences Dean Prabu David.

Member of the Little Rock Nine, Civil Rights activist and Michigan State University alumnus Ernest Green
Credit Courtesy

The CONVERSATION portion of the program will also be available via Livestream and WKAR Public Media on Facebook.

WHERE
The  Communication Arts & Sciences Building, WKAR Studio A, 404 Wilson Road, on the campus of Michigan State University.

PARKING
Parking is available in the adjacent Trowbridge Road parking ramp and includes regular MSU parking rates.
 Parking address: 1149 Red Cedar Road, East Lansing, MI 48824.

WATCH THE CONVERSATION LIVE
Livestream or at WKAR at Facebook.

MORE ABOUT ERNEST GREEN
Green helped integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1957. After graduating in 1958, he was awarded an anonymous scholarship to MSU, where he earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in sociology. It later became known that the scholarship was sponsored by then-president of MSU, John Hannah. Under President Jimmy Carter, Green served four years working as Assistant Secretary of Labor. Later in his career, Green worked for 30 years as a managing director for a Wall Street investment firm.Green and other members of the Little Rock Nine were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by President Bill Clinton in 1999.

MORE ABOUT "THE ROAD TO LITTLE ROCK"
The Road to Little Rock tells the courageous story of one visionary judge and nine determined teenagers who demonstrated enduring positive human qualities of courage, honor, determination, and responsibility.  This story begins in 1957 as nine African-American teenagers sought enrollment at an all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas.  In 1957 many school districts continued to ignore the 1954 Supreme Court ruling of Brown v Board of Education which declared that segregation in public schools was unconstitutional.

SUPPORTED BY
MSU Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Initiatives, ComArtSci Inclusiveness Committee, College of Communication Arts and Sciences, College of Social Science and MSU Alumni Association.