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Early Monday morning, crews of volunteers and small business owners worked to board up broken windows, sweep shattered glass, and scrub spray paint off of buildings that protesters damaged in the Sunday protest.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

Hundreds gathered at the Michigan State Capitol Sunday to protest the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who was killed after White police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for minutes.

Protesters marched around the Capitol, down Michigan Avenue, and to East Lansing and back throughout the day—remaining largely non-violent. However, as daylight began to fade, a switch flipped and the protest turned violent leaving broken windows, a burnt carcass of a car, and damage to downtown businesses.

Flickr / Creative Commons

Today's Current Sports with Al Martin is dedicated toward discussing the unrest in our nation due to the killing of George Floyd at the hands of Minnesota law enforcement last week. Al gives his candid thoughts on where our nation must go in order for true change to happen. 
 


East Lansing city hall sign photo
WKAR file photo

The cities of Lansing and East Lansing collect income taxes from residents and from people who work in the cities but live elsewhere.

Work from home orders will have an impact on non-residents who pay income taxes in either city.


Hundreds of protesters marched at the capitol and around Lansing throughout the day Sunday protesting the police killing of George Floyd and police brutality.
Abigail Censky, WKAR

 This post was last updated Sunday, May 31st at 11:30 p.m.

Hundreds gathered at the Michigan State Capitol Sunday to protest the police killing of George Floyd, a Black man in Minneapolis who was killed after White Police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for  minutes.

Dr. Joniegh Khaldun
Michigan Executive Office of the Governor

If you look at Michigan's official data on COVID-19 cases right now, you’ll see information on both diagnostic tests and serologic, or antibody tests.

Those antibody tests can show if someone has had a past infection of the coronavirus, though they can’t be used to diagnose COVID-19.

But prior to this week, data on both COVID-19 and antibody tests was reported together in the state’s database.

Fair & Equal MI along with two Democrat state lawmakers, the campaign is suing the Michigan Secretary of State, Board of Canvassers, and Director of Elections to forestall the end of their campaign after falling more than 162,000 signatures short.
James Durkee / flickr creative commons

As ballot measure initiatives across the country fizzled out during the coronavirus pandemic Fair and Equal Michigan pivoted to gathering electronic signatures.

But, when Wednesday’s deadline came to turn in signatures to be vetted for a place on Novembers’ ballot, the gay-rights campaign fighting for non-discrimination protections fell more than 162,000 signatures short.

Now, along with two Democrat state lawmakers, the campaign is suing the Michigan Secretary of State, Board of Canvassers, and Director of Elections to forestall the end of their campaign.

Ingham County Courthouse
WKAR File Photo

Historic unemployment levels triggered by the coronavirus pandemic are putting many Michigan homeowners at risk of foreclosure. 

 

On Thursday, Governor Gretchen Whitmer extended the deadline for making delinquent property tax payments to June 30. 

 

May 29, 2020 - Laura Cox | OTR OVERTIME

May 29, 2020

After the episode taping concludes, the guest and panel continue to chat.

Watch now at video.wkar.org

May 29, 2020 - Laura Cox | OFF THE RECORD

May 29, 2020

The panel discusses who should lead the Midland flood investigation.  The guest is Laura Cox.

Watch now at video.wkar.org

The panel discusses who should lead the Midland flood investigation and the flap continues over the first gentleman. The guest is Chair of the Michigan republican party Laura Cox. Panelists Chad Livengood, Kyle Melinn and Rick Pluta join senior capitol correspondent Tim Skubick to discuss the week in Michigan government and politics.

Abigail Censky / WKAR-MSU

A Michigan court on Thursday ordered a barber to close his shop and stop defying the state’s coronavirus restrictions, though he vowed to keep cutting hair.

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